Infection Protection Message Unfortunately this specification of service has not yet been completely translated.

The aim of infection protection is to prevent communicable diseases in humans, to detect infections at an early stage and to prevent their spread. The Infection Protection Act (IfSG) requires doctors and laboratories to report. A distinction is made between name-name reports of pathogens and unnamed reports of pathogen detections as well as reports of vaccination damage. Named pathogens: Doctors and laboratories for medical diagnostics are obliged to provide the local health offices with reports of conspicuous findings should the pathogens designated in the law be diagnosed during an examination or sample. The required registration forms are provided by the respective state authorities. Unnamed evidence of pathogens: The evidence of the pathogens referred to in Section 7 (3) of the IfSG is not to be reported directly to the Robert Koch Institute. The RKI provides special laboratory alarm sheets for this purpose. Vaccination damage: Suspicion of damage to health beyond the usual level of vaccination reaction is subject to notification. The notification is made by the doctor to the local health office. The aim of infection protection is to prevent communicable diseases in humans, to detect infections at an early stage and to prevent their spread. This is the task of the relevant body in cooperation with other institutions. They shall record the reportable communicable diseases, evaluate this information and take the necessary measures to prevent and control infectious diseases.

No documentation is required.


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Notification form: Reportable illness in accordance with Sections 6, 8, 9 IfSG and extended reporting obligation in M-V Laboratory notification form: Evidence of pathogens in accordance with Sections 7, 8, 9 IfSG and extended reporting requirements in M-V The necessary forms are available at:

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